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-- johnson says to bush what are you doing here? bush he said, we just want to pay our respects. johnson was advising bush for the next couple of years about whether or not to run for office. johnson's the one who when bush was going to run for the senate he said what's the difference between the house and the senate? he said what's the difference between chicken and chicken salad? can you imagine now a republican congressman from houston going to see off a democratic president out of respect? >> especially mika the inauguration of a newly elected president in your party when everybody is most excited to elbow their way to the front. for george h.w. bush that's a great example. another great example, william f. buckley. he had liberal friends. in fact, he campaigned for liberals that were his friends even though he knew it upset some on the conservative side. for william f. buckley, it wasn't a blood sport. >> to end this block, to counter it just a bit, and i'm sorry but it has the added value of being true, the president does need to reach out.agree. but he has, an
. >> surely finding osama bin laden, surely passing civil rights legislation as lyndon johnson was able to do and before that, surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the gun lobby. >> so if we can defeat the germans in world war ii, i guess the n.r.a. is supposed to be-- is that what he's saying? >> right, he's giving himself a little bit of wiggle room. i didn't exactly compare the nra to the nazis, stew $them in the same spot and let the audience sort it out. we're sure to see, on gun owners opponents of gun control and language when you see words likenazis. george orwell in 1946 a famous essay, the word fascism should only be used for people with hitler and-- that was 1946, 70 years later we're still doing it. >> jon: do you see it differently, judy? >> not really, i thought that schieffer was very close to the line of advocacy as opposed to reading the news and being straight about a news story. i do think that even though there was no direct comparison there's clearly an inference that the n.r.a. is equivalent to the nazis and raises questions whether o
biography of johnson. they're talking about how big to be on civil rights and one of the so-called wise men goes to johnson and basically said that's not practical. it's a worthy cause but it's a lost cause. and johnson turns around and goes, what the hell's the presidency for? i actually thought yesterday was an interesting day. it was one of the days where compare it, say, to health care. this was a big idea and the president went out there with an ambitious proposal. the question, though, in american politics now is whether he can match the intensity of the nra. what matters is not simply 60/40, 70/30 in polls. you know that. can he mobilize on a sustained basis? people who really care about this issue? >> and this is another reason why it's such a game changer because so many people have been engaged by the sandy hook massacre, whatever the nra spins, people that want sensible gun safety laws are going to spend three, four, five times as much. mika, also the argument that there's a slippery slope and if you get rid of these military-style assault weapons and the magazines, the high-capa
, but the last time we took it seriously during the johnson years. that program started in washington. give me two minutes to give you some sense and this audience some sense of what has happened to poverty since 1989. talking specifically about income inequality -- the top 5% of washington, d.c., household -- in the nation's capital in the origination of the world -- the top 5% of households made more than $500,000 on average last year. top 5%. $500,000 on average last year. the bottom 20% made less than $9,500 last year. i'm no economist, but that is a ratio of 54 to one. the district of columbia, the nation's capital, is the worst of all the 50 states in the union. that is what income inequality looks like in the nation's capital. income inequality has increased in 49 of 50 states since 1989. the poverty rate increase in 43 states. most sharply in nevada. ravage of course by the housing bust, and in my home state of indiana, which sought a rise in low-paying jobs. in all 50 states, the richest 20% of households made far greater income gains than any other quintile, up 12% national ly. incom
. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, trying to find a better job can likbe frustrating.gs, so at university of phoenix we're working with a growing list of almost two thousand corporate partners - companies like microsoft, american red cross and adobe - to create options for you. not only that, we're using what we learn from these partners to shape our curriculum, so that when you find the job you want you'll be a perfect fit. let's get to work. so, i'm working on a cistern intake valve, and the guy hands me a locknut wrench. no way! i'm like, what is this, a drainpipe slipknot? wherever your business takes you, nobody keeps you on the road like progressive commercial auto. [ flo speaking japanese ] [ shouting in japanese ] we work wherever you work. now, that's progressive. call or click today. [ male announcer ] when diarrhea hits, kaopectate stops it fast. powerful liquid relief speeds to the source. fast! [ male announcer ] stop the uh-oh fast with kaopectate. >>> on friday, december 14th, i p
's package. max baucus of montana, senator heidi heitkamp of north dakota, senator johnson of south dakota. senator donnelley of i7d ind. senator begich of alaska, senator manchin of west virginia, senator tester of montana. however, senator mark warner spoke out in favor of the president's plan and said he believes it has bipartisan support. those senators all have a or a-plus ratings from the national rifle association. reid has a b rating. these senators know they will lose their high rating and maybe become a target with the nra if they vote for a sensible assault weapons ban. you see, we had the assault weapons ban back in 1994, but we're so screwed up in washington right now they're even afraid to go back to that. every senator should explain to their constituency why they would not cast a vote for the assault weapons ban. what's the holdup? what are you afraid of? certainly it's not the nra. these senators should not fear the national rifle association. the nra didn't affect any races in the last election cycle and it probably won't do it the next time around. now, if senate democra
. >> patrick leahy, thank you for being with us. >> we continue conversation with fawn johnson and jennifer steinhauer. >> what is the moment you will remember? >> he expressed frustration about the gun hearings he's about to hold. it reflects the difficult position that he is in and the dynamic of the entire democratic caucus. there are a lot of members that come from red states or have a very moderate, pro-gun record. he is in a tough spot himself in terms of protecting and working with his members who are concerned about going too far or doing anything on guns. and also as regarding his role as chairman. he mentions decisions had to go through his committee. dianne feinstein is running an assault weapons bill. she's about to introduce it. other members are interested. he wants to be associated with and control this process but he has to work very carefully. >> you wrote about this about the devil will be the details. >> what is an assault weapon? how do you define it? this is not a surprise, the kinds of questions i am asking, will not be answered immediately. these are the things you ha
released a letter to vice president scott smith, our second vice president kevin johnson and i drafted, 131 of our mayors sign, calling on congress to adopt a bipartisan and balanced approach deficit reduction by incorporating spending cuts with additional revenue. we took the same message to both political conventions and to the presidential debate where mayors of both parties were active and visible participants, speaking for commonsense solutions to the pending fiscal crisis. in just one week after the election, our leadership came to washington. we met with the vice president biden in the white house, the entire house democratic leadership, senate majority caucus, and rising leaders such as senator marco rubio, and other key decision-makers, pushing for action to the fiscal cliff. during those meetings we made it known that cities have already led on deficit reduction. mayors know how to balance budgets. [applause] we do it every day. we do it every year. through this recession we made the tough decisions that washington has been unwilling to make. while we also maintained key investmen
. and being able to stay where they are comfortable is good news. >> reporter: here at johnson middle school in southeast one reason for keeping this school open was the safety of students. chancellor henderson was concerned if you sent the students to other nearby schools there could be violence. >> this is kids from different neighborhoods who have established problems with each other, gangs, crews, beefs. >> reporter: some students will be transferred to nearby schools. others will be bussed. when it comes to the school buildings themselves, the hope is to turn them into recreation or community centers. what about more school closures in the future? here's what the chancellor had to say. >> i'm hoping not to have to do this again, my friend. >> reporter: let's hope so. this plan will save the district $8.5 million. that will then be re invested into other schools. i know it went fast so if you want to look at the closings again you can find them at myfoxdc.com. xdc.com. >>> looking ahead to president obama's inauguration on monday metro says it will sell special one-day passes. they'll fe
of the issues of the day. today, the 40th anniversary of the death of president johnson lbj fought for the passage of the voting rights act in 1965. this is what he had to say the day he signed the act into law. >> today is a sound of freedom as huge as any victory that's ever been won on any battlefield. >> michael: and even as he spoke then, you know, that long ago the supreme court has agreed to hear a constitutional challenge to the act this year. president obama's inaugural address yesterday, though, he recognizes the battle for voting rights isn't over. here's the president. >> obama: our journey is not complete a citizen is not forced to wait for hours to exercise the right to vote. >> michael: now that he has been inaugurated, do you think voters going to the ballot is at risk. >> i think it is. the republicans are a minority party. they got the minority in the presidential and senate and over all house races they're not working with the demographic roots that are growing in this country, which are largely latinos. and it will make it impossible for them to break into that
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regulation -- until it happened. consider the civil rights act of 1964. it took johnson's legislative genius to overcome what seemed to be an unshakeable logjam. in our lifetimes we have served enough non-trivial change to impaire that the iron grip of these forces can be shattered and policy can progress. and the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance of civil obligation will command sustained attention from our political leadership, as lobbyists apply their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours will discharge a critical role in principled scaffolding for the debate. our scholars have investigated gun violence for the last two decades. we have produced national recognized research to curtail gun violence. we have accumulated a wealth of knowledge and we hope much of it will come to the floor the next few days. we have convened scholars and advocates and want to sue this opportunity to cut through the din of the shrill and incendiary by identifying specific recommendations that evidence- based analysis will work and can be rendered congruent with our legal institution
and fairly? vote for president johnson on november 3rd. the stakes are too high for you to stay home. >> congressman grimm, is there an anti-new york attitude in the republican party nationally, anti-new york? >> i don't think so. i mean, there's always been a little bias against new york. i think that goes way back. there's no question. i've seen it and felt it. but i think what we have right now is just, you know, the deep-rooted concern overall that the country is spending money that it doesn't have and the need to be fiscally responsible, which i wholeheartedly agree with and i respect, it's cluster when things like this happen, natural disasters -- >> i didn't hear this during katri katrina. when the southerners were voting their own pocket boost, when the southern republicans were helping themselves out in what was really a tragedy as well as this one and it was very vivid, maybe more vivid in terms of national coverage than new york, i got to tell you, i didn't hear anybody talking about offsets. i heard them saying let's get the money to people like hailey bauer bor. >> i und
johnson, professor at school of law and lou palumbo, director of the elite protection and security firm also a former police officer. you had an awful tragedy in your early life involving firearms. despite that, you have quite strong views that there should be no more gun control, as such. why is that? >> because evil is going to happen. that is the thing. they will find a way. if someone wants to do somebody harm, they're going to do it regardless of whether they use a gun, knife or any sort of tool. all this is doing is punishing the legal, good citizens of the united states and taking away rights that were given to us by our founding fathers. >> do you think the founding fathers ever had in mind when they framed the second amendment at a time when muskets were the preferred weapon of choice and took 15 seconds to reload an ar-15 bushmaster style rifle? >> you could look at the first amendment and say could the founding fathers imagine something like the internet and cable news networks? if we're going to sit there and start applying the second amendment to different weapons, where do
something inside me dies. i watched ben johnson win that 100 meters that time. i loved that for a day. and then it was all crushed. my favorite sport is cricket. i found a huge game turned out to be rigged, and it killed me. and then i heard about lance armstrong, and i thought not him as well. so he was guilty. he did cheat the whole time. nothing is right about that. >> right. and look, a lot of people say everybody in that sport is doing that. i don't know. i don't bike. i'm not going to ever run the tour de france. but you feel badly that there is so much pressure that everybody feels if the other guy is doing it, i have to do it. >> i hate it for my children. have i three teenaged boys. all play sport, love sport, very competitive. i don't want them thinking the way to win is cheating. >> but you know what? i don't think they see that. i don't think our kids do. i think they see what we want, what we put out. if as a parent you espouse fair play and honesty, in not just sport, but your life, i think that's what they see. you know, look, i think lance armstrong and all those, any
from new hampshire, johnson and washington bureau chief susan page and congressman from maryland and former naacp president. welcome all of you. >> thank you. >> i want to start with guns. congressman. do you think -- were you surprised that the president went as big as he did? of course i really wasn't. the president got elected after a long, tough struggle to put forth a vision. i think this is the first part of the vision. i don't think it was planned. i think what happened in the tragedy here kind of spurred him in that direction. and you know, this use of executive order as we have seen since 1933 when fdr first went to the congress and asked for those powers. so they have been around. this is a bold effort. and i think he did so many executive orders, simply to try to increase some of the pressure on the congress and on others. >> in 1994, you had a hard time getting this done and you had democratic congress. john, you're from a state, live free or die. even if you're a democrat or republican, you're unified when it comes to all things guns. is there any part of this you th
to confront this issue while in office, pretty rare. johnson did it in 1968. got a pretty watered down bill. >> harold, there's been a lot of washington analysis about how far any of this is going to go. i, for one, think that we are in -- newtown was an inflexion point, and i do think that the landscape has changed, and i don't know that it's as trite as if you believe in magic, but eugene robinson has an op ed, and i think we are well to listen -- we would do well to listen to eugene's words, which basically amount to don't listening to those that say that president obama's bold plan to reduce gun violence, including an assault weapons ban, has no chance in congress. i seem to recall that health care reform is deemed impossible too until it happened. >> i would agree with you. there is not only a change in how people view guns and particularly n.r.a. members. i was an nra member. i am no longer a member. i just declined membership after a while. newtown didn't do it. there's a culture in the country, as many know, who believe that guns are part of recreation and sport. they take their kid
tim johnson, democrat of south dakota, "it makes common sense to not have one size fits all. senator mark begich, democrat of alaska, "i feel like it's going to be hard for they of these pieces of legislation to pass at this point." these are democrats. what is he going to bring to bear on that? >> it is a tough issue. i will say this, these are commonsense proposals that respect the rights of gun owners. let's start there. and i think if you look at high-capacity magazines, assault weapons, universal background checks, the progress we can make on mental health and school safety, all of these enjoy enormous support of the american people. democrats and republicans, so i think that putting together the legislative coalition is going to be hard obviously but we're very confident. i do think things have changed since newtown, you know, senator manchin and republicans and democrats are thinking anew about this issue. >> but senator harry reid, the democratic leader in the senate, and those senators i just mentioned all signaling that the assault weapons ban is not likely to get through a
the civil rights act of 1964. it took lyndon johnson to probably send it forward. he overcame what seems to be an unshakable logjam. in short, in our lifetimes, we have served enough nontrivial policy changes to recognize the inherent iron grip of status quo forces can be shattered and policy can progress. in the next few weeks, we can anticipate and hope that the debate over the regulation of guns and the balance between individual rights and civic obligation will command sustained into serious attention from our political leadership. advocates will mobilize as lobbyists plied their cases. in this unruly mix, universities like ours can and will discharge a critical role in providing principled scaffolding for this debate. here at johns hopkins, our scholars have been investigating the public health effects of gun violence for well over two decades. for the past 17 years, the center for gun aussie and research, envisaged by our colleague, has provided a home for that study areas producing nationally recognized research and recommendations aimed at understanding and curtailing the impact
] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, see lioutdoors, or in.ight. transitions® lenses automatically filter just the right amount of light. so you see everything the way it's meant to be seen. maybe even a little better. visit your eyecare professional today to ask about our newest lenses, transitions vantage and transitions xtractive lenses. experience life well lit. ask which transitions adaptive lens is best for you. >>> you know you're not supposed to do it, but taking your eyes off the road, even for a moment, can have a devastate impact. >> and cnn's sandra endo is here. you actually climbed into a simulator to sort of illustrate all of this. >> yeah. and it was very surprising, joe and kate, just what could happen, if you take your eyes off the road, just for a few seconds. really, it just shows, also, how deadly cell phones could be or any type of distraction inside your car. and it happened to me in a simulator. but we also spoke with one woman who shared with us her tragedy real-life story. if this picture doesn't say
tonight, britta. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, alriwoah! did you get that? and...flip! yep, look at this. it takes like 20 pictures at a time. i never miss anything. isn't that awesome? uh that's really cool. you should upload these. i know, right? that is really amazing. the pictures are so clear. kevin's a handsome devil that phone does everything! search dog tricks. okay, see if we can teach him something cool. look at how lazy kevin is. kevin, get it together dude cmon, kevin take 20 pictures with burst shot on the galaxy s3. >>> welcome back, everybody. you are watching "starting point." michael skolnik of global grindth com. abby huntsman, chris frates of national journal. nice to have you with us. let's talk about what is a big, big, big bummer for boeing. what is going on with the dreamliner? a big, hot mess. >> another big incident overnight. another emergency landing in japan. forced to make an emergency landing there. now have you two major japanese airlines pulling
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laden, surely passing civil rights legislation as lyndon johnson was able to do and before, that surely defeating the nazis was a much more formidable task than taking on the gun lobby? >> where is the media outrage? when bob schieffer of cbs compares obama's gun initiatives to defeating hitler, in other words, taking on the nra is the equivalent of taking on adolf hitler. now is there room for that in our discourse today? why is that not an example of just over the top defamation, exaggeration, insulting, not to mention the lack of civility? jon: all right, judy. take that on, does he have a report? >> i think rush limbaugh talking about over the top is a bit much. i do think that, you know, what bob schieffer was saying, this is a president who has taken on tough issues just as others have taken on tough challenges. i do think that comparing even indirectly, the sandy hook massacre with the defeat of the nazis is a bit much and i also was struck by bob schieffer's assertion that massacre was the worst day in the country's history since 9/11. that is kind of also a very sweeping statem
. not tonight." [ female announcer ] to nurses everywhere, thank you, from johnson & johnson. >>> standing at the president's side today over at the white house, four children each of whom wrote him letters like this one which reads -- and let me read it to you. i am writing you to ask you to stop gun violence. jessica yellin spoke to some of the children after the white house event. watch this. >> reporter: what inspired you to write the president? >> well, i was so overwhelmed with sadden with the sandy hook shooting and i knew that as one person i couldn't do anything but i knew that president obama could. so i decided to write him a letter. >> reporter: what do you hope can happen? >> well, i hope it's much harder for people to buy guns. i hope that like people with mental illness can't buy a gun and -- yeah. >> reporter: tell me a little bit about what you said in the letter. >> well, basically i just said that i hoped that he would do something and i said that i have four brothers and sisters and i would be sad if one of them passed away and i also told him that i know that laws have
on the shoulders of people who have been in the white house. president lincoln, kennedy, johnson. the asa stands on the shoulders of the black people who experienced it in the white house. as you noted in your intro, this goes from thosroindividuals who worked to build the white house when washington, d.c., when the country first came into existence, washington dc did not exist. it literally had to be built and it took 10 years. much of that labour from clearing the land, moving the trees and rocks came from african americans and slave labor. the iconic buildings that we know, the capital, the white house, both were built not only by unskilled black labor, people who did just sort of the hard work, but still black labor like carpenters, or african- americans. the first african-american who had engaged in the president's residence whether it was the white house we know now in washington or in the residence of the president george washington when he first went to new york and then when he moved from new york to the president's residence in philadelphia, and both of those residences, washington too
amendment freedom. joining us now is jason johnson, and republican strategist ron bonjean. jason, i want to get your thoughts on this ad. it's powerfupowerful. >> it's powerful and ridiculous. look, the president's children should always be off limits in any sort of political discussion. and the idea that them get prognosis tekted is in some way an indicator of him not caring about other children is ridiculous. but it is the nra, and i don't think it fur thers the debate a all and lowers it to name calling. >> ron, do you think it's ridiculous? >> i think it is probably over the top but extremely effective. people are already talking about it. they're trying to get an effort going regarding protection in schools, having, you know, armed guards in schools. do i think that's possible? the money isn't there for it. but the ad itself is driving news on it. and, yes, it is quite aggressive, but it is effective. everybody is talking about it right now. >> a lot of free advertising here on cnn, i got to admit to that. the ad doesn't just target president obama now. take a look at some other sta
, and lyndon b. johnson in six years as majority leader faced one, and harry reid has faced 361 in the same six-year period. and even if you have the 60 votes to end one, they take up the power of the senate. >> stephanie: you know what is interesting. they just did this study -- this is no surprise to you, but the 112th congress was the most polarized ever. the distance between the two due to record levels between the 111th and 112th even different than the before when they used to take out pistols and shoot each over. >> yes. >> stephanie: i look at poll after poll -- i mean 90% of the american people want background checks for gun -- and you think -- and yet you hear over and over we're probably not going to be able to get any of this gun stuff done. but this is part of the reason right? >> it is part of the reason. why are we talking about reducing food stamps and hunger programs at a time when we can't even close a loophole for a oil company. well, it's a filibuster. dream act, why couldn't we do it? filibuster. and we had 59 votes to close debate, and we needed 6
-- lyndon johnson filed it once in his six years. i filed it 390 some odd times. so we've got to change that. if you invoke that on a piece of legislation, people get 30 hours to sit around and do nothing. i want to get rid of that. i think we should not have the 30-hours post. and i think that we have to make sure that on a regular piece of legislation, if somebody wants to continue objecting to it after it's been invoked they should have to stand and talk. there should be a talking filibuster. >> okay. so there's -- can you explain this 30-hour thing? i think that -- in the grand scheme of things is the most egregious which is, you know, filibustering the motion to proceed and then, there's this weird kind of period after you filibuster with motion to proceed where it's mandated no one can do anything? >> well, there are two familiar low periods. first is when eye file the 16 senators file a motion that moves towards kloture and that's two full working days and then you have the vote and if you achieve, you're cutting off debate, then there's a 30-hour period that follows after that. and t
decade, will there be any legal fallout? let's talk to a guy who is an expert, peter johnson, jr. >> what is the legal fallout? the legal fallout is that they tried to indict him earlier, the federal government walked away from it. the u.s. anti-doping agency is very angry at him. they want to suck his blood even when he wants to fess up to it. he wants to say, i want to go back and be a triathlete. i saw mr. babbitt on this morning who was one of the great triathletes. he was pushing for him to get back into the triathlete competition. the real issue is, is he going to be a victim or hostage of the five law firms that he's paying at this point, or is he going to dare to be great in the same way that he conquered cancer? i beat cancer as well at age 19. i wish i had a role model like him when i was fighting it. he can turn his life around. will he be forgiven? i don't know. i think as a christian, i have an obligation to forgive. but will it be forgotten? what will he do in his life? will he take small steps or will he say yeah, i really screwed up, kids. don't do this. i'm going to chan
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)